Ruby Wax credits new treatment for lifting her out of depression

Ruby Wax credits new <a class=treatment for lifting her out of depression [Instagram] Credit: Bang Showbiz” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/oqKhmVVxxCY9eDbL2fnN6g–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MA–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/N6_EFnjwsS0Wi9EJdDKvkg–~B/aD0wO3c9MDthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/bang_showbiz_628/9ec536684621755e18e648176985ca94″/>

Ruby Wax credits new treatment for lifting her out of depression [Instagram] Credit: Bang Showbiz

Ruby Wax has credited a new treatment with helping her recover from a recent bout of depression.

The 69-year-old actress revealed just two weeks ago that she was suffering from her first bout of depression in 12 years, but now believes undergoing repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment helped her.

She shared a photo of herself on Instagram, wearing a special helmet for the procedure and wrote, “I’m better now, but the quicksand extraction of depression is so slow it’s faster to see your hair grow.

“The last time it happened to me about twelve years ago it took me months to get back to what I was, this time it only took weeks.”

After joking that the procedure saved her from being one of the “walking dead,” Ruby went into detail about what it entails.

She wrote: “I’m better now but the quicksand extraction of depression is so slow it’s faster to see your hair grow. Last time this happened to me was about twelve years ago years, it took months to get back to who I used to be, this time it only took weeks.

“Here’s how I retired from being among the walking dead, there’s a new machine called rTMS (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation).

“If you had told me five years ago that something like this existed, I would have thought you had watched too much science fiction. rTMS is different from ECT (for electroconvulsive therapy), which is the latest saloon treatment for those who don’t.With ECT they knock you out, put some between your teeth so you don’t bite your tongue and let the tension tear.

“The electrical currents cause a little seizure that hopefully changes brain chemistry. In other words, you’re fried and even worse, there’s a good chance there’s short-term memory loss. term. Not good for any human being who wants to remember his Name.”

Ruby explained that the procedure is 60% successful and revealed how lucky she feels to be part of that percentage.

She said: “The Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator doesn’t use electricity, it uses a magnetic pulse that kicks your neurons into action, like restarting a broken down car. It works on 60% of patients with depression. , OCD and a few other mental disorders and thank you Jesus I was in that 60 percent.

“They put something that looks like a 50s hair dryer on your head and then the banging started.

“Looks like Woody Woodpecker was dropped on the left side of your head and he’s having a hay day. Those magnets hit you about 36 times every few seconds, up to 55 times. That’s about 1,980 strokes to recalibrate your brain (not pleasant).

“I’ve had twenty sessions and a rework of meds and who would have dreamed it, I’m almost human again. I can almost smile, which is an impossibility during the dark nights of mental knives. There’s only There are a handful of places in the UK that offer treatment using this equipment, as mental illness is probably the lowest on the list when it comes to taking illness seriously.

“For me, that’s actually the most serious because a diseased brain is usually the underlying cause of most physical illnesses.

“But we know the stigma blah blah blah… and we don’t do enough of it.

“That’s why with mental illness, forget getting the right help, forget getting the right meds, forget a bed in a hospital, forget seeing a psychiatrist – so really why would they bother putting this magical equipment available to lean 1 of 4?

“I will continue to lead the fight.”

About Margie Peters

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