Review of the Skoda Octavia Limited Edition Wagon 2021 Australia

8.5

Security, value and features

Things we love

  • Goldilocks Engine
  • Convenience and smart features
  • Comfort and class
  • Friendly and stable dynamics

Not really

  • RS price without power
  • Only around for a while
  • Minor technical issues
  • Development of maintenance plans

Yesou can look at the Skoda Octavia, as many do with the marque’s lineup, and think of it as the Volkswagen equivalent (Golf, in this case) with a different badge.

But the Skoda Octavia limited edition in particular is more than just a rebadged Golf Wagon. For starters, he’s physically bigger by just a tiny bit. It is 56mm longer, 40mm wider and 33mm taller. I said a little.

Under the hood too, there is a little more. A 2.0-litre EA888 turbo four replaces the 1.4 found in most Golf and Octavia ranges. The EA888 is the same engine found in the Golf GTI and Octavia RS, but with the wick up in those cases.

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But the Octavia Limited Edition also costs a bit more than a Golf Wagon. At $51,990 drive-up, the Limited Edition costs more than $10,000 north of the Golf Life Wagon ($36,250 more on the roads).

But with more in the cabin and more under the hood, is it worth it?

This Octavia’s list of standard goodies is long, even visible from outside the car in the form of its 19-inch silver alloys, as well as less obvious features like fully automatic matrix LED headlights.

Inside though, that’s where you really start to notice just how much the Limited Edition has it all, and why its drive-in price tops $50,000.

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Upholstery made of a mix of genuine and manufactured leather, for starters, is welcome on the power-adjustable front seats that are also heated, ventilated and have massage functions.

It’s also worth noting that the Octavia is part of what must be a very short list of cars in which seat heating and cooling can be activated simultaneously. Honestly, it’s more useful than it looks.

There’s a bit of simple elegance to the interior layout, too, with denim-like fabric and leather adorning the dashboard in a style that could easily have come from Peugeot. Although the understated gear selector at first glance seems a little small for anyone used to a traditional shifter.

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Its lack of HVAC button controls can be a little annoying, although the Octavia (like its Golf twin) makes up for this with a climate control button that opens the appropriate menu on the main screen, which also features ‘Smart Climate’ controls. including options like ‘Defog Windows’ or ‘Warm Hands’ to adjust airflows and temperature behavior accordingly.

The rest of the infotainment tech is solid. Shared with Volkswagen and relatively simple to use, it’s a step up from previous systems, but occasionally subject to very minor lag when doing things like scrolling to navigate a map view and more with Android Auto or wireless Apple CarPlay, although this seems to be an issue with the software rather than the car.

Other models also showed a slight lag with audio and menus on wireless mirroring. The Canton sound system itself is excellent, and another valuable point for the limited edition.

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Plugging in a phone for mirroring slightly reduces the usefulness of the wireless charger, although passengers can still use it. There’s also a cup holder insert to sit a phone upright, useful for keeping a phone in place and out of the way. Score a ‘simply smart’ point for Skoda there. Another point of difference between Skoda and the Golf is the umbrella stowed inside the door.

Behind the driver, another. Rear passengers not only benefit from the same level of seating comfort as those in front, but also from a handy holder for a tablet (a phone is also suitable) which can be attached to either of the front seats.

Fold down the rear seats and the 640 liters of boot space become a cavernous 1700L storage compartment, fitted with a net to hold cargo in place and hooks for hanging bags. There’s even a blanket that can be used to wrap things around to protect them or the trunk itself. Also a win over its Golf sibling, the Octavia boot has 29 liters more with the seats up and 58 more with the seats down.

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Luckily, the difference between the two doesn’t get too far apart when it comes to their road manners. With the same essential underpinnings as the Mk8 Golf, the Octavia Limited Edition Wagon is a talented and comfortable cruiser.

Well-judged suspension tuning and a multi-link rear setup give the wagon a feeling of stability without being too firm, making it easy to control its placement on the road at any speed. The steering is also comfortable, with the flat-bottomed wheel being a pleasant diameter and shape to use, with quick rack-and-pinion, precise cornering and a relatively light level of assist.

Steering and suspension feedback from the road isn’t incredibly detailed, although the trade-off for comfort seems appropriate, and any adjustments you’d need to make in the corners are still clear.

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The 225/40 Pirelli Cinturato P7 tires, along with electronic traction control, effectively prevent slips on wet roads, and the aforementioned multi-link suspension keeps the rear of the wagon in place well.

But it’s what’s on the front that might make this limited edition really appealing to some. It’s got 2.0 liters of Volkswagen’s turbocharged EA888 goodness under the hood, the veteran four-cylinder producing 140kW and 320Nm instead of the 110 and 250 made by the smaller 1.4 found in other Octavias, or the Golf .

On the spec sheet, a claimed 7.4 seconds to 100 km/h already exceeds the 9.1 seconds of the lower wagons, even with a good deal of the added weight. The Limited Edition has a curb weight of 1435 kg (slightly less than a curb weight), compared to the 1355 kg of an Octavia Ambition or Style Wagon. Even the Golf wagon weighs 1371 kg.

However, all that means is that the Limited Edition likes to drink a little more than the rest of the range, although its claimed 6.2L/100km isn’t astronomical compared to the 5.9L/100km of the others.

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Lively and playful aren’t quite that, and it’s not like the front wheels are overwhelmed with force, but the Limited Edition’s added traction is certainly noticeable and welcome in even the most mundane driving situations. . Seven-speed DSG dual-clutch automatic transmission also has a bit more torque to work with, but isn’t as smooth as the Golf’s traditional eight-speed auto.

Like the Golf, however, the Octavia has a five-star ANCAP rating, falling in the middle for adult occupant protection, but good enough for child safety. Its rating for driver assistance systems was better than most in the mid-size car category, which seems appropriate. Its active systems are non-intrusive, but keep drivers on their toes when needed.

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Compared to lesser Octavias, the Limited Edition also gets Traffic Jam Assist, Emergency Assist and Side Assist as standard, along with the tech you get on all variants like as park assist, adaptive cruise control, lane keeping assist and front AEB. Its rear view camera and good outward vision from all angles also contribute to easy obstacle avoidance.

The timing of the limited edition is also quite fortuitous for quick shoppers. Until December 31 this year, Skoda is offering a seven-year warranty on its usual five. Skoda also offers a seven-year service pack, which costs $2,400 for the Octavia and includes the first three services for free.

Without the service pack, maintenance prices are based on monthly subscriptions, with four tiers based on distance traveled, across three plan “tiers”: Full, Essential, or Value. Prices vary widely between $50 per month and $145 per month, so it’s best to see which one fits.

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Luckily, Skoda maintenance is the biggest downside to Octavia ownership, and it’s something you should only have to do once.

If you can shell out the $52,000 to own one, the Octavia Limited Edition is brimming with practicality and its extra features over other models are welcome. It’s the choice for those who want to head upmarket but don’t like the idea of ​​the sportier RS.

Skoda Australia expects the limited edition to hang around for a few months from time of writing, so if something like a Mazda 6 Atenza or the more exxy Peugeot 508 is on your list, check it out too. look at the Octavia. For the right person, it might even be enough to convince you not to drop $80,000 on this BMW 3 Series Touring. Chances are no, but $30,000 is a good saving.

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Skoda Octavia Limited Edition Wagon specifications

Body: Five-door wagon
To drive: YOUR
Motor: 2.0 liter I4, turbocharged
Transmission: 7-speed DSG
To be able to: 140 kW at 6,500 rpm
Torque: 320Nm @ 1500-4180rpm
0-100km/h: 7.4sec (claimed)
Fuel consumption: 6.2L/100km (combined)
Weight: 1435kg (tare)
Suspension: MacPherson struts front / multi-link rear
L/W/H: 4689mm/1829mm/1488mm
Wheelbase: 2686mm
Brakes: Ventilated discs (f); Full discs (r)
Tires: 255/40R19
Wheels: 19-inch alloy wheels (space-saving spare wheel)
Price: $51,990 by car

8.5

Security, value and features

Things we love

  • Goldilocks Engine
  • Convenience and smart features
  • Comfort and class
  • Friendly and stable dynamics

Not really

  • RS price without power
  • Only around for a while
  • Minor technical issues
  • Development of maintenance plans

About Margie Peters

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